Pacific dogwood (Cornus nuttallii)

Dogwood family (Cornaceae) | Deciduous Trees and Shrubs plant group | Also known as Western dogwood
31 reports

Pacific dogwood is a Western tree with 4 large white rounded bracts that look like the petals of a flower. The leaves are arranged oppositely and have prominent veins that curve parallel to the margins of the leaves.

Identification Hints
Pacific dogwood is a Western tree with 4 large white rounded bracts that look like the petals of a flower. The leaves are arranged oppositely and have prominent veins that curve parallel to the margins of the leaves.
Did You Know?
Pacific dogwood bark was used by Nlaka 'pamux, indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast, to make brown dye. Bark has also been used as a blood purifier, lung strengthener, stomach treatment and possibly to cure malaria.
Leaves
The leaves are oppositely arranged, simple, oval shaped, 3 to 5 in (7.5 to 12.5 cm) long and 2 to 3 in (5 to 7.5 cm) broad.
Flowers
Large, showy, creamy white blossoms sometimes flushed with pink. The individual flowers are small and inconspicuous. They are 0.08 to 0.12 in (0.2 to 0.3 cm) across and produced in a dense, rounded, greenish-white flower head with a diameter of 0.8 in (2 cm). The 4 to 8 large white “petals” are actually bracts (modified leaves), each 1.5 to 3 in (3.75 to 7.5 cm) long and broad. Flowers bloom from mid-spring to summer.
Fruits
Pacific dogwood has fruits that are small red to pink clusters of berries
Bark
 Young bark is thin and smooth. Ridges develop later making the trunk appear scale-like.
Habitat
Mountain woods and stream banks between 3000 and 6000 ft (900 to 1800 m).
Distribution in the US
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